Date: 
September 17, 2014
Author: 
Tomás O'Leary
Date: 
9.17.2014
Author: 
Tomás O'Leary

This was originally posted on computereconomics.com

Earlier this month, the jury in Las Vegas reached its verdict in the Oracle v. Rimini Street lawsuit, a closely-watched case involving third-party maintenance (3PM) in the enterprise software industry.Although the jury awarded Oracle approximately $50 million in damages, the amount was far below what Oracle expected. Moreover, the jury found that Rimini Street’s copyright infringement was “innocent,” not “willful,” that Oracle suffered no lost profits as a result, and that neither Rimini Street nor its CEO, Seth Ravin, engaged in any tortious business conduct.

Assuming the jury’s verdict stands up against potential appeals, the case sets an important precedent for how 3PM providers should operate to ensure they are not violating the intellectual property rights of software owners. We expect customer use of third-party maintenance will increase as a result of this verdict.

Oracle: Powered by Maintenance FeesLike most large enterprise software vendors, Oracle makes enormous profit on maintenance fees paid by its customers. By Oracle’s own admission in SEC financial filings, the margin on these services is north of 90%. This is an important revenue stream for Oracle because... Continue reading

Recent Posts

Your New Year’s Resolution to Cut Costs
Say goodbye to forced upgrades and enjoy 2019 happily supported by your promised New Year’s resolution.
As IBM® sells their legacy software to HCL, how are IBM® clients affected?
How the IBM® HCL acquisition will affect IBM®’s legacy clients?
Big Blue sells off Legacy
On December 6th, 2018, IBM® announced that they are selling some of their software products to HCL for a shockingly low price of $1.8B.

XXXX Recent Posts

Ihr guter Vorsatz fürs neue Jahr – Kosten senken
Verabschieden Sie sich von erzwungenen Upgrades und genießen Sie 2019, glücklich unterstützt von Ihrem Vorsatz fürs neue Jahr.
Märchenstunde: 5 „Fakten“ über Software-Audits, die Sie nicht glauben sollten
Um IBM-Audits ranken sich zahlreiche Mythen und Unwahrheiten. Hier sind fünf, die Sie auf keinen Fall glauben sollten.
Warum zumindest eine Firma Software-Audits liebt
IBM-Software-Audits dienen nicht nur dazu, Lizenzdefizite aufzuspüren – sie sind für Big Blue auch eine wichtige Umsatzquelle